Carmelo Mesa-Lago

Carmelo Mesa-Lago

Nació en La Habana en 1934. Licenciado en Derecho Universidad de La Habana. Máster en Economía por la Universidad de Miami. Doctor en Derecho por la Universidad Madrid. Doctor en Relaciones Laborales y Seguridad Social por la Universidad de Cornell. Catedrático Distinguido Emérito de Economía y Estudios Latinoamericanos de la Universidad de Pittsburgh. Profesor o Investigador Visitante en once universidades o institutos de investigación en Alemania, Argentina, Chile, Cuba, Estados Unidos, España, Reino Unido y Uruguay. Ha impartido conferencias en 39 países. Ex-presidente de la Asociación de Estudios Latinoamericanos. Premio Internacional de la OIT al Trabajo Decente, compartido con Nelson Mandela. Premio Alexander von Humboldt. Autor o editor de 94 libros y 303 artículos o capítulos en libros sobre economía cubana, sistemas económicos comparados y economía de la seguridad social, publicados en 7 idiomas en 34 países. Libros más recientes sobre Cuba: "Buscando un modelo económico para América Latina ¿Mercado, socialista o mixto?"; "La economía y el bienestar social en Cuba a comienzos del siglo XXI"; "Cuba en la era de Raúl Castro: reformas económico-sociales y sus efectos"; "La protección social en América Latina y el Caribe: Cuba". Co-autor: "Cuba’s Aborted Reform"; "Cuba Under Raul Castro: Assessing the Reforms", y "Voces de cambio del emergente sector no estatal en Cuba."

The blockade against Cuba, Trump and the falsification of the truth

The blockade against Cuba, Trump and the falsification of the truth

The intensification of the blockade/embargo On February 15, 1970 I participated in a national public television program, broadcast from the University of Miami, which promoted the lifting of the U.S. blockade/embargo against Cuba; I used arguments similar to those used by President Barack Obama when he announced in 2015 the process of normalization of relations with Cuba. Since 1970, in my work, I have opposed that policy. In an essay recently written with Cuban economist Pavel Vidal, we take stock of the intensification of Trump's economic measures against Cuba: Foreign investment: He implemented Title III of the Helms-Burton Act of 1996 (blockade/embargo), which authorizes filing lawsuits in the United States against foreign companies/individuals that have made transactions with goods nationalized by the Cuban government. An effect of US$8 billion in certified claims is estimated, plus 200,000 uncertified claims worth tens of billions of dollars. There are many established lawsuits, although several investor nations have also established counterclaims or have been opposed to existing ones. Although more than 100 existing investors apparently remain on the island, some large corporations have left and potential investors are assessing all the risks involved in doing business with Cuba, others are postponing their decision...

Measures proposed by Cuban economists in the face of the crisis

Measures proposed by Cuban economists in the face of the crisis

Through more than half a century of studying and publishing about Cuba’s economy I have endeavored to disseminate and comment on the crucial work of economists on the island, who have contributed so much to economic thinking and fruitful debate inside and outside Cuba. I have learned a lot from their work and I maintain academic relationships with almost all of them. Being supporters of the Revolution, they have played a leading role in pointing out problems, judging government policies and proposing sensible alternatives. In the current difficult situation they have pointed out the severity of the potential crisis, the lack of imagination and daring to attack it, the inadequacy of the plan in the face of the enormous problems that exist and that are approaching, the absence in the discussion of long-standing key issues, the need to deepen the reforms which are postponed or obstructed, the importance of applying the successful policies of China and Vietnam, the need for monetary and exchange rate unification, the scarce treatment of private property and microenterprises that should be the object of a law, the need to transform the state enterprise by making it autonomous and competitive in order to eliminate state subsidies,...

Temporary problem or structural crisis in Cuba?

Temporary problem or structural crisis in Cuba?

There is an important debate in Cuba about whether the current problems, such as fuel and food shortages, are the result of a temporary situation (that will soon be resolved) or a structural crisis of the economy. There are also speculations about whether there will be a second "Special Period." President Miguel Díaz-Canel has been characterized for having more contact with the people and meeting more often with the Council of Ministers and other entities, which is an advance. Due to citizen concern, he gave a speech on September 11 in which he explained to the country the current energy situation, the possibility of another Special Period and the measures being taken by the government. In his speech he affirmed that there is no need to be "scared or fear" and that the government had anticipated energy problems and has taken steps to address them. He stressed that the country is in "a temporary situation" and that "the problems are merely related to energy, but not supply...." On the other hand, he denounced Trump’s harmful actions to prevent the arrival of fuel to Cuba and that some shipping companies have withdrawn, which is why “there is a low...

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